concord

5 definitions found

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Fox \Fox\ (f[o^]ks), noun; pl. {Foxes}. [AS. fox; akin to D. vos, G. fuchs, OHG. fuhs, foha, Goth. fa['u]h[=o], Icel. f[=o]a fox, fox fraud; of unknown origin, cf. Skr. puccha tail. Cf. {Vixen}.]

1. (Zool.) A carnivorous animal of the genus {Vulpes}, family {Canid[ae]}, of many species. The European fox ({V. vulgaris} or {V. vulpes}), the American red fox ({V. fulvus}), the American gray fox ({V. Virginianus}), and the arctic, white, or blue, fox ({V. lagopus}) are well-known species.

Note: The black or silver-gray fox is a variety of the American red fox, producing a fur of great value; the cross-gray and woods-gray foxes are other varieties of the same species, of less value. The common foxes of Europe and America are very similar; both are celebrated for their craftiness. They feed on wild birds, poultry, and various small animals.

Subtle as the fox for prey. --Shak.

2. (Zool.) The European dragonet.

3. (Zool.) The fox shark or thrasher shark; -- called also {sea fox}. See {Thrasher shark}, under {Shark}.

4. A sly, cunning fellow. [Colloq.]

We call a crafty and cruel man a fox. --Beattie.

5. (Naut.) Rope yarn twisted together, and rubbed with tar; -- used for seizings or mats.

6. A sword; -- so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox. [Obs.]

Thou diest on point of fox. --Shak.

7. pl. (Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians which, with the Sacs, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin; -- called also {Outagamies}.

{Fox and geese}. (a) A boy's game, in which one boy tries to catch others as they run one goal to another. (b) A game with sixteen checkers, or some substitute for them, one of which is called the fox, and the rest the geese; the fox, whose first position is in the middle of the board, endeavors to break through the line of the geese, and the geese to pen up the fox.

{Fox bat} (Zool.), a large fruit bat of the genus {Pteropus}, of many species, inhabiting Asia, Africa, and the East Indies, esp. {P. medius} of India. Some of the species are more than four feet across the outspread wings. See {Fruit bat}.

{Fox bolt}, a bolt having a split end to receive a fox wedge.

{Fox brush} (Zool.), the tail of a fox.

{Fox evil}, a disease in which the hair falls off; alopecy.

{Fox grape} (Bot.), the name of two species of American grapes. The northern fox grape ({Vitis Labrusca}) is the origin of the varieties called {Isabella}, {Concord}, {Hartford}, etc., and the southern fox grape ({Vitis vulpina}) has produced the {Scuppernong}, and probably the {Catawba}.

{Fox hunter}. (a) One who pursues foxes with hounds. (b) A horse ridden in a fox chase.

{Fox shark} (Zool.), the thrasher shark. See {Thrasher shark}, under {Thrasher}.

{Fox sleep}, pretended sleep.

{Fox sparrow} (Zool.), a large American sparrow ({Passerella iliaca}); -- so called on account of its reddish color.

{Fox squirrel} (Zool.), a large North American squirrel ({Sciurus niger}, or {S. cinereus}). In the Southern States the black variety prevails; farther north the fulvous and gray variety, called the {cat squirrel}, is more common.

{Fox terrier} (Zool.), one of a peculiar breed of terriers, used in hunting to drive foxes from their holes, and for other purposes. There are rough- and smooth-haired varieties.

{Fox trot}, a pace like that which is adopted for a few steps, by a horse, when passing from a walk into a trot, or a trot into a walk.

{Fox wedge} (Mach. & Carpentry), a wedge for expanding the split end of a bolt, cotter, dowel, tenon, or other piece, to fasten the end in a hole or mortise and prevent withdrawal. The wedge abuts on the bottom of the hole and the piece is driven down upon it. Fastening by fox wedges is called foxtail wedging.

{Fox wolf} (Zool.), one of several South American wild dogs, belonging to the genus {Canis}. They have long, bushy tails like a fox.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Concord \Con"cord\, noun [F. concorde, L. concordia, fr. concors of the same mind, agreeing; con- + cor, cordis, heart. See {Heart}, and cf. {Accord}.]

1. A state of agreement; harmony; union.

Love quarrels oft in pleasing concord end. --Milton.

2. Agreement by stipulation; compact; covenant; treaty or league. [Obs.]

The concord made between Henry and Roderick. --Davies.

3. (Gram.) Agreement of words with one another, in gender, number, person, or case.

4. (Old Law) An agreement between the parties to a fine of land in reference to the manner in which it should pass, being an acknowledgment that the land in question belonged to the complainant. See {Fine}. --Burril.

5. [Prob. influenced by chord.] (Mus.) An agreeable combination of tones simultaneously heard; a consonant chord; consonance; harmony.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Concord \Con"cord\, noun A variety of American grape, with large dark blue (almost black) grapes in compact clusters.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Concord \Con*cord"\, verb (used without an object) [F. concorder, L. concordare.] To agree; to act together. [Obs.] --Clarendon.

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

Concord

noun

1: capital of the state of New Hampshire; located in south central New Hampshire on the Merrimack river [syn: {Concord}, {capital of New Hampshire}]

2: a harmonious state of things in general and of their properties (as of colors and sounds); congruity of parts with one another and with the whole [syn: {harmony}, {concord}, {concordance}]

3: the determination of grammatical inflection on the basis of word relations [syn: {agreement}, {concord}]

4: town in eastern Massachusetts near Boston where the first battle of the American Revolution was fought

5: agreement of opinions [syn: {harmony}, {concord}, {concordance}]

6: the first battle of the American Revolution (April 19, 1775) [syn: {Lexington}, {Concord}, {Lexington and Concord}]

verb

1: go together; "The colors don't harmonize"; "Their ideas concorded" [syn: {harmonize}, {harmonise}, {consort}, {accord}, {concord}, {fit in}, {agree}]

2: arrange by concord or agreement; "Concord the conditions for the marriage of the Prince of Wales with a commoner"

3: arrange the words of a text so as to create a concordance; "The team concorded several thousand nouns, verbs, and adjectives"

4: be in accord; be in agreement; "We agreed on the terms of the settlement"; "I can't agree with you!"; "I hold with those who say life is sacred"; "Both philosophers concord on this point" [syn: {agree}, {hold}, {concur}, {concord}] [ant: {differ}, {disagree}, {dissent}, {take issue}]


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