bittersweet

4 definitions found

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Staff \Staff\ (st[.a]f), noun; pl. {Staves} (st[=a]vz or st[aum]vz; 277) or {Staffs} (st[.a]fs) in senses 1-9, {Staffs} in senses 10, 11. [AS. staef a staff; akin to LG. & D. staf, OFries. stef, G. stab, Icel. stafr, Sw. staf, Dan. stav, Goth. stabs element, rudiment, Skr. sth[=a]pay to cause to stand, to place. See {Stand}, and cf. {Stab}, {Stave}, noun]

1. A long piece of wood; a stick; the long handle of an instrument or weapon; a pole or stick, used for many purposes; as, a surveyor's staff; the staff of a spear or pike.

And he put the staves into the rings on the sides of the altar to bear it withal. --Ex. xxxviii. 7.

With forks and staves the felon to pursue. --Dryden.

2. A stick carried in the hand for support or defense by a person walking; hence, a support; that which props or upholds. "Hooked staves." --Piers Plowman.

The boy was the very staff of my age. --Shak.

He spoke of it [beer] in "The Earnest Cry," and likewise in the "Scotch Drink," as one of the staffs of life which had been struck from the poor man's hand. --Prof. Wilson.

3. A pole, stick, or wand borne as an ensign of authority; a badge of office; as, a constable's staff.

Methought this staff, mine office badge in court, Was broke in twain. --Shak.

All his officers brake their staves; but at their return new staves were delivered unto them. --Hayward.

4. A pole upon which a flag is supported and displayed.

5. The round of a ladder. [R.]

I ascended at one [ladder] of six hundred and thirty-nine staves. --Dr. J. Campbell (E. Brown's Travels).

6. A series of verses so disposed that, when it is concluded, the same order begins again; a stanza; a stave.

Cowley found out that no kind of staff is proper for an heroic poem, as being all too lyrical. --Dryden.

7. (Mus.) The five lines and the spaces on which music is written; -- formerly called {stave}.

8. (Mech.) An arbor, as of a wheel or a pinion of a watch.

9. (Surg.) The grooved director for the gorget, or knife, used in cutting for stone in the bladder.

10. [From {Staff}, 3, a badge of office.] (Mil.) An establishment of officers in various departments attached to an army, to a section of an army, or to the commander of an army. The general's staff consists of those officers about his person who are employed in carrying his commands into execution. See {['E]tat Major}.

11. Hence: A body of assistants serving to carry into effect the plans of a superintendent or manager; sometimes used for the entire group of employees of an enterprise, excluding the top management; as, the staff of a newspaper. [1913 Webster +PJC]

{Jacob's staff} (Surv.), a single straight rod or staff, pointed and iron-shod at the bottom, for penetrating the ground, and having a socket joint at the top, used, instead of a tripod, for supporting a compass.

{Staff angle} (Arch.), a square rod of wood standing flush with the wall on each of its sides, at the external angles of plastering, to prevent their being damaged.

{The staff of life}, bread. "Bread is the staff of life." --Swift.

{Staff tree} (Bot.), any plant of the genus {Celastrus}, mostly climbing shrubs of the northern hemisphere. The American species ({Celastrus scandens}) is commonly called {bittersweet}. See 2d {Bittersweet}, 3 (b) .

{To set up one's staff}, {To put up one's staff}, {To set down one's staff} or {To put down one's staff}, to take up one's residence; to lodge. [Obs.]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Bittersweet \Bit"ter*sweet'\, adjective Sweet and then bitter or bitter and then sweet; esp. sweet with a bitter after taste; hence (Fig.), pleasant but painful.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Bittersweet \Bit"ter*sweet'\, noun

1. Anything which is bittersweet.

2. A kind of apple so called. --Gower.

3. (Bot.) (a) A climbing shrub, with oval coral-red berries ({Solanum dulcamara}); woody nightshade. The whole plant is poisonous, and has a taste at first sweetish and then bitter. The branches are the officinal {dulcamara}. (b) An American woody climber ({Celastrus scandens}), whose yellow capsules open late in autumn, and disclose the red aril which covers the seeds; -- also called {Roxbury waxwork}.

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

bittersweet

adjective

1: tinged with sadness; "a movie with a bittersweet ending"

2: having a taste that is a mixture of bitterness and sweetness [syn: {bittersweet}, {semisweet}]

noun

1: poisonous perennial Old World vine having violet flowers and oval coral-red berries; widespread weed in North America [syn: {bittersweet}, {bittersweet nightshade}, {climbing nightshade}, {deadly nightshade}, {poisonous nightshade}, {woody nightshade}, {Solanum dulcamara}]

2: twining shrub of North America having yellow capsules enclosing scarlet seeds [syn: {bittersweet}, {American bittersweet}, {climbing bittersweet}, {false bittersweet}, {staff vine}, {waxwork}, {shrubby bittersweet}, {Celastrus scandens}]


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OPEN and TRANSPARENT Say "Hell No!" to the TPP. PUBLIC INTEREST

Click here to read Wikileaks' TPP Investment Chapter: https://wikileaks.org/tpp-investment/press.html. This agreement is being kept secret from the world public for a good reason. It is decidedly NOT in the PUBLIC INTEREST. This is an example of the high level government corruption that results when diplomatic and intelligence processes are NOT OPEN and TRANSPARENT and ACCOUNTABLE. This is an example of a product of too much secrecy. It is naked corruption. Thank you Wikileaks.

President Barack Obama

Barack Obama, I thought you were supposed to be THE MOST OPEN and TRANSPARENT administration by all reasonable measures. You disappoint me with this TPP. You are NOT OPEN and TRANSPARENT. I know every phone call you make for every citizen without a warrant right now period. Constitutional scholar. Ubiquitous surveillance. Your CIVIL RIGHTS have been trampled upon. I know everyone you call. I know everyone you e-mail. I have your internet under surveillance. We provide the phone companies and ISPs with retroactive immunity around here. They don't mind cooperating with us. They are compelled by law to keep our arrangement a secret. What are they supposed to say? Your meta-data is PRIVATE. Who you talk to when and for how long is PRIVATE. Barack Obama, you have violated the PRIVACY of everyone who uses a telephone without a warrant that is based on probable cause. That is an abuse of power. I am calling it like it is. You are a charming and affable fellow but you screwed us. Don't give us this "It's just metadata" bullshit. It's every telephone relationship of every citizen updated every 24 hours period. I call a spade a spade.

PRIVATE Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton RESPONSIBILITY

Hillary Clinton, what is your position on the TPP? Do you have a hand in this mess? Are you in on this? Can you take credit for some of this? What do you know about this? Now that Wikileaks has exposed this, what do you have to say about it, as a potential Commander in Chief? Do you think this is a good idea or not as written here: https://wikileaks.org/tpp-investment/WikiLeaks-TPP-Investment-Chapter/page-1.html? We're all on the same page here. What do you think, are we reading the same document or not? Is this in the PUBLIC INTEREST? Here it is in black and white. Corruption enshrined in the world's biggest trade deal which is totally secret and hidden from the public. Elizabeth Warren thinks this is a bad deal. What do you think? Is this a RESPONSIBLE question for me to ask? "Fast-Track" my ass! This deal sucks for ordinary citizens and taxpayers. That's my opinion. I'd like to know yours.

United States of America Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Roberts

I know every phone call you make for every citizen without a warrant right now period. Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States of America. Constitutional expert. Ubiquitous surveillance. I know everyone you call period. Your CIVIL RIGHTS have been trampled upon. You have no PRIVACY. Thank you Edward Snowden. While I may have some issues with the scope of your disclosures, I think this is wrong and that the citizens needed to know this. Our Commander in Chief and Congress and judicial system let us all down. They have all violated the PUBLIC TRUST. Mr. Citizens United has appointed some corrupt FISA judges who apparently don't respect the sanctity of the Fourth Amendment. The corruption is systemic. The system is broken. Click here for the HBO Documentary, "Citizenfour."

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

My cell phone is one of my "effects," as referenced in the above paragraph. I'm sorry, you are all corrupt.

PRIVACY FREE SPEECH FREEDOM OF THE PRESS economic opportunity FREEDPM FOR ALL DO NO HARM LEGAL TENDER Monetary System TRADING SYSTEM Stock Market supercomputing We need better cryptography. supercomputing

The Law of The Land Caduceus

These are the kinds of things that I talk about.


Thursday, April 2, 2015 12:09:13 AM Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)

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