Trees

3 definitions found

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Tree \Tree\ (tr[=e]), noun [OE. tree, tre, treo, AS. tre['o], tre['o]w, tree, wood; akin to OFries. tr[=e], OS. treo, trio, Icel. tr[=e], Dan. trae, Sw. tr[aum], tr[aum]d, Goth. triu, Russ. drevo, W. derw an oak, Ir. darag, darog, Gr. dry^s a tree, oak, do'ry a beam, spear shaft, spear, Skr. dru tree, wood, d[=a]ru wood. [root]63, 241. Cf. {Dryad}, {Germander}, {Tar}, noun, {Trough}.]

1. (Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single trunk.

Note: The kind of tree referred to, in any particular case, is often indicated by a modifying word; as forest tree, fruit tree, palm tree, apple tree, pear tree, etc.

2. Something constructed in the form of, or considered as resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and branches; as, a genealogical tree.

3. A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber; -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree, chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.

4. A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.

[Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree. --Acts x. 39.

5. Wood; timber. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of silver but also of tree and of earth. --Wyclif (2 Tim. ii. 20).

6. (Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution. See {Lead tree}, under {Lead}.

{Tree bear} (Zool.), the raccoon. [Local, U. S.]

{Tree beetle} (Zool.) any one of numerous species of beetles which feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs, as the May beetles, the rose beetle, the rose chafer, and the goldsmith beetle.

{Tree bug} (Zool.), any one of numerous species of hemipterous insects which live upon, and suck the sap of, trees and shrubs. They belong to {Arma}, {Pentatoma}, {Rhaphigaster}, and allied genera.

{Tree cat} (Zool.), the common paradoxure ({Paradoxurus musang}).

{Tree clover} (Bot.), a tall kind of melilot ({Melilotus alba}). See {Melilot}.

{Tree crab} (Zool.), the purse crab. See under {Purse}.

{Tree creeper} (Zool.), any one of numerous species of arboreal creepers belonging to {Certhia}, {Climacteris}, and allied genera. See {Creeper}, 3.

{Tree cricket} (Zool.), a nearly white arboreal American cricket ({Ecanthus niv[oe]us}) which is noted for its loud stridulation; -- called also {white cricket}.

{Tree crow} (Zool.), any one of several species of Old World crows belonging to {Crypsirhina} and allied genera, intermediate between the true crows and the jays. The tail is long, and the bill is curved and without a tooth.

{Tree dove} (Zool.) any one of several species of East Indian and Asiatic doves belonging to {Macropygia} and allied genera. They have long and broad tails, are chiefly arboreal in their habits, and feed mainly on fruit.

{Tree duck} (Zool.), any one of several species of ducks belonging to {Dendrocygna} and allied genera. These ducks have a long and slender neck and a long hind toe. They are arboreal in their habits, and are found in the tropical parts of America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.

{Tree fern} (Bot.), an arborescent fern having a straight trunk, sometimes twenty or twenty-five feet high, or even higher, and bearing a cluster of fronds at the top. Most of the existing species are tropical.

{Tree fish} (Zool.), a California market fish ({Sebastichthys serriceps}).

{Tree frog}. (Zool.) (a) Same as {Tree toad}. (b) Any one of numerous species of Old World frogs belonging to {Chiromantis}, {Rhacophorus}, and allied genera of the family {Ranidae}. Their toes are furnished with suckers for adhesion. The flying frog (see under {Flying}) is an example.

{Tree goose} (Zool.), the bernicle goose.

{Tree hopper} (Zool.), any one of numerous species of small leaping hemipterous insects which live chiefly on the branches and twigs of trees, and injure them by sucking the sap. Many of them are very odd in shape, the prothorax being often prolonged upward or forward in the form of a spine or crest.

{Tree jobber} (Zool.), a woodpecker. [Obs.]

{Tree kangaroo}. (Zool.) See {Kangaroo}.

{Tree lark} (Zool.), the tree pipit. [Prov. Eng.]

{Tree lizard} (Zool.), any one of a group of Old World arboreal lizards (formerly grouped as the {Dendrosauria}) comprising the chameleons; also applied to various lizards belonging to the families {Agamidae} or {Iguanidae}, especially those of the genus {Urosaurus}, such as the {lined tree lizard} ({Urosaurus ornatus}) of the southwestern U.S.

{Tree lobster}. (Zool.) Same as {Tree crab}, above.

{Tree louse} (Zool.), any aphid; a plant louse.

{Tree moss}. (Bot.) (a) Any moss or lichen growing on trees. (b) Any species of moss in the form of a miniature tree.

{Tree mouse} (Zool.), any one of several species of African mice of the subfamily {Dendromyinae}. They have long claws and habitually live in trees.

{Tree nymph}, a wood nymph. See {Dryad}.

{Tree of a saddle}, a saddle frame.

{Tree of heaven} (Bot.), an ornamental tree ({Ailantus glandulosus}) having long, handsome pinnate leaves, and greenish flowers of a disagreeable odor.

{Tree of life} (Bot.), a tree of the genus Thuja; arbor vitae.

{Tree onion} (Bot.), a species of garlic ({Allium proliferum}) which produces bulbs in place of flowers, or among its flowers.

{Tree oyster} (Zool.), a small American oyster ({Ostrea folium}) which adheres to the roots of the mangrove tree; -- called also {raccoon oyster}.

{Tree pie} (Zool.), any species of Asiatic birds of the genus {Dendrocitta}. The tree pies are allied to the magpie.

{Tree pigeon} (Zool.), any one of numerous species of longwinged arboreal pigeons native of Asia, Africa, and Australia, and belonging to {Megaloprepia}, {Carpophaga}, and allied genera.

{Tree pipit}. (Zool.) See under {Pipit}.

{Tree porcupine} (Zool.), any one of several species of Central and South American arboreal porcupines belonging to the genera {Chaetomys} and {Sphingurus}. They have an elongated and somewhat prehensile tail, only four toes on the hind feet, and a body covered with short spines mixed with bristles. One South American species ({Sphingurus villosus}) is called also {couiy}; another ({Sphingurus prehensilis}) is called also {c[oe]ndou}.

{Tree rat} (Zool.), any one of several species of large ratlike West Indian rodents belonging to the genera {Capromys} and {Plagiodon}. They are allied to the porcupines.

{Tree serpent} (Zool.), a tree snake.

{Tree shrike} (Zool.), a bush shrike.

{Tree snake} (Zool.), any one of numerous species of snakes of the genus {Dendrophis}. They live chiefly among the branches of trees, and are not venomous.

{Tree sorrel} (Bot.), a kind of sorrel ({Rumex Lunaria}) which attains the stature of a small tree, and bears greenish flowers. It is found in the Canary Islands and Tenerife.

{Tree sparrow} (Zool.) any one of several species of small arboreal sparrows, especially the American tree sparrow ({Spizella monticola}), and the common European species ({Passer montanus}).

{Tree swallow} (Zool.), any one of several species of swallows of the genus {Hylochelidon} which lay their eggs in holes in dead trees. They inhabit Australia and adjacent regions. Called also {martin} in Australia.

{Tree swift} (Zool.), any one of several species of swifts of the genus {Dendrochelidon} which inhabit the East Indies and Southern Asia.

{Tree tiger} (Zool.), a leopard.

{Tree toad} (Zool.), any one of numerous species of amphibians belonging to {Hyla} and allied genera of the family {Hylidae}. They are related to the common frogs and toads, but have the tips of the toes expanded into suckers by means of which they cling to the bark and leaves of trees. Only one species ({Hyla arborea}) is found in Europe, but numerous species occur in America and Australia. The common tree toad of the Northern United States ({Hyla versicolor}) is noted for the facility with which it changes its colors. Called also {tree frog}. See also {Piping frog}, under {Piping}, and {Cricket frog}, under {Cricket}.

{Tree warbler} (Zool.), any one of several species of arboreal warblers belonging to {Phylloscopus} and allied genera.

{Tree wool} (Bot.), a fine fiber obtained from the leaves of pine trees.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Tree \Tree\, verb (used with an object) [imp. & p. p. {Treed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Treeing}.]

1. To drive to a tree; to cause to ascend a tree; as, a dog trees a squirrel. --J. Burroughs.

2. To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree; as, to tree a boot. See {Tree}, noun, 3.

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

tree

noun

1: a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms

2: a figure that branches from a single root; "genealogical tree" [syn: {tree}, {tree diagram}]

3: English actor and theatrical producer noted for his lavish productions of Shakespeare (1853-1917) [syn: {Tree}, {Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree}]

verb

1: force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape [syn: {corner}, {tree}]

2: plant with trees; "this lot should be treed so that the house will be shaded in summer"

3: chase an animal up a tree; "the hunters treed the bear with dogs and killed it"; "her dog likes to tree squirrels"

4: stretch (a shoe) on a shoetree [syn: {tree}, {shoetree}]


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OPEN and TRANSPARENT Say "Hell No!" to the TPP. PUBLIC INTEREST

Click here to read Wikileaks' TPP Investment Chapter: https://wikileaks.org/tpp-investment/press.html. This agreement is being kept secret from the world public for a good reason. It is decidedly NOT in the PUBLIC INTEREST. This is an example of the high level government corruption that results when diplomatic and intelligence processes are NOT OPEN and TRANSPARENT and ACCOUNTABLE. This is an example of a product of too much secrecy. It is naked corruption. Thank you Wikileaks.

President Barack Obama

Barack Obama, I thought you were supposed to be THE MOST OPEN and TRANSPARENT administration by all reasonable measures. You disappoint me with this TPP. You are NOT OPEN and TRANSPARENT. I know every phone call you make for every citizen without a warrant right now period. Constitutional scholar. Ubiquitous surveillance. Your CIVIL RIGHTS have been trampled upon. I know everyone you call. I know everyone you e-mail. I have your internet under surveillance. We provide the phone companies and ISPs with retroactive immunity around here. They don't mind cooperating with us. They are compelled by law to keep our arrangement a secret. What are they supposed to say? Your meta-data is PRIVATE. Who you talk to when and for how long is PRIVATE. Barack Obama, you have violated the PRIVACY of everyone who uses a telephone without a warrant that is based on probable cause. That is an abuse of power. I am calling it like it is. You are a charming and affable fellow but you screwed us. Don't give us this "It's just metadata" bullshit. It's every telephone relationship of every citizen updated every 24 hours period. I call a spade a spade.

PRIVATE Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton RESPONSIBILITY

Hillary Clinton, what is your position on the TPP? Do you have a hand in this mess? Are you in on this? Can you take credit for some of this? What do you know about this? Now that Wikileaks has exposed this, what do you have to say about it, as a potential Commander in Chief? Do you think this is a good idea or not as written here: https://wikileaks.org/tpp-investment/WikiLeaks-TPP-Investment-Chapter/page-1.html? We're all on the same page here. What do you think, are we reading the same document or not? Is this in the PUBLIC INTEREST? Here it is in black and white. Corruption enshrined in the world's biggest trade deal which is totally secret and hidden from the public. Elizabeth Warren thinks this is a bad deal. What do you think? Is this a RESPONSIBLE question for me to ask? "Fast-Track" my ass! This deal sucks for ordinary citizens and taxpayers. That's my opinion. I'd like to know yours.

United States of America Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Roberts

I know every phone call you make for every citizen without a warrant right now period. Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States of America. Constitutional expert. Ubiquitous surveillance. I know everyone you call period. Your CIVIL RIGHTS have been trampled upon. You have no PRIVACY. Thank you Edward Snowden. While I may have some issues with the scope of your disclosures, I think this is wrong and that the citizens needed to know this. Our Commander in Chief and Congress and judicial system let us all down. They have all violated the PUBLIC TRUST. Mr. Citizens United has appointed some corrupt FISA judges who apparently don't respect the sanctity of the Fourth Amendment. The corruption is systemic. The system is broken. Click here for the HBO Documentary, "Citizenfour."

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

My cell phone is one of my "effects," as referenced in the above paragraph. I'm sorry, you are all corrupt.

PRIVACY FREE SPEECH FREEDOM OF THE PRESS economic opportunity FREEDPM FOR ALL DO NO HARM LEGAL TENDER Monetary System TRADING SYSTEM Stock Market supercomputing We need better cryptography. supercomputing

The Law of The Land Caduceus

These are the kinds of things that I talk about.


Thursday, April 2, 2015 3:06:34 AM Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)

DEFINE.COM_Trees_2015-04-02_03-06-34_54-166-114-14