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Club

4 definitions found

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Club \Club\ (kl[u^]b), noun [Cf. Icel. klubba, klumba, club, klumbuf[=o]ir a clubfoot, SW. klubba club, Dan. klump lump, klub a club, G. klumpen clump, kolben club, and E. clump.]

1. A heavy staff of wood, usually tapering, and wielded with the hand; a weapon; a cudgel.

But make you ready your stiff bats and clubs; Rome and her rats are at the point of battle. --Shak.

2. [Cf. the Spanish name bastos, and Sp. baston staff, club.] Any card of the suit of cards having a figure like the trefoil or clover leaf. (pl.) The suit of cards having such figure.

3. An association of persons for the promotion of some common object, as literature, science, politics, good fellowship, etc.; esp. an association supported by equal assessments or contributions of the members.

They talked At wine, in clubs, of art, of politics. --Tennyson.

He [Goldsmith] was one of the nine original members of that celebrated fraternity which has sometimes been called the Literary Club, but which has always disclaimed that epithet, and still glories in the simple name of the Club. --Macaulay.

4. A joint charge of expense, or any person's share of it; a contribution to a common fund.

They laid down the club. --L'Estrange.

We dined at a French house, but paid ten shillings for our part of the club. --Pepys.

{Club law}, government by violence; lynch law; anarchy. --Addison.

{Club root} (Bot.), a disease of cabbages, by which the roots become distorted and the heads spoiled.

{Club topsail} (Naut.), a kind of gaff topsail, used mostly by yachts having a fore-and-aft rig. It has a short "club" or "jack yard" to increase its spread.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Club \Club\ (kl[u^]b), verb (used with an object) [imp. & p. p. {Clubbed} (kl[u^]bd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Clubbing}.]

1. To beat with a club.

2. (Mil.) To throw, or allow to fall, into confusion.

To club a battalion implies a temporary inability in the commanding officer to restore any given body of men to their natural front in line or column. --Farrow.

3. To unite, or contribute, for the accomplishment of a common end; as, to club exertions.

4. To raise, or defray, by a proportional assesment; as, to club the expense.

{To club a musket} (Mil.), to turn the breach uppermost, so as to use it as a club.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Club \Club\, verb (used without an object)

1. To form a club; to combine for the promotion of some common object; to unite.

Till grosser atoms, tumbling in the stream Of fancy, madly met, and clubbed into a dream. --Dryden.

2. To pay on equal or proportionate share of a common charge or expense; to pay for something by contribution.

The owl, the raven, and the bat, Clubbed for a feather to his hat. --Swift.

3. (Naut.) To drift in a current with an anchor out.

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

club

noun

1: a team of professional baseball players who play and travel together; "each club played six home games with teams in its own division" [syn: {baseball club}, {ball club}, {club}, {nine}]

2: a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today" [syn: {club}, {social club}, {society}, {guild}, {gild}, {lodge}, {order}]

3: stout stick that is larger at one end; "he carried a club in self defense"; "he felt as if he had been hit with a club"

4: a building that is occupied by a social club; "the clubhouse needed a new roof" [syn: {clubhouse}, {club}]

5: golf equipment used by a golfer to hit a golf ball [syn: {golf club}, {golf-club}, {club}]

6: a playing card in the minor suit that has one or more black trefoils on it; "he led a small club"; "clubs were trumps"

7: a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drink; "don't expect a good meal at a cabaret"; "the gossip columnist got his information by visiting nightclubs every night"; "he played the drums at a jazz club" [syn: {cabaret}, {nightclub}, {night club}, {club}, {nightspot}]

verb

1: unite with a common purpose; "The two men clubbed together"

2: gather and spend time together; "They always club together"

3: strike with a club or a bludgeon [syn: {club}, {bludgeon}]

4: gather into a club-like mass; "club hair"


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